Automated Vehicles Need a Vision Test to Put Safety First

Over the last several months, the League of American Bicyclists has been working with a diverse coalition of transportation groups to make sure that Automated Vehicle legislation puts safety first.

Now is a critical time for Congress to know that the current Automated Vehicle legislation: 

  • Must include a "vision test" so that Automated Vehicles can detect, identify, and safely respond to people biking and walking; and
  • Must ensure that safety regulations occur as soon as possible, instead of perhaps a decade or more in the future as seen in some drafts.

Please join us in asking Congress to pass a strong Automated Vehicle bill that puts safety first and includes these necessary safety components.

Contact your Elected Officials Now!

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Thank you for taking action to ensure that Automated Vehicles are regulated in a way that ensures that they keep people who bike and walk safe. Please encourage others to act by sharing on social media!

You can find more information about the League of American Bicyclists' work on automated vehicles on our blog. The League is actively working with insurance groups and others to make sure that the promised benefits of automated vehicles are realized, read more about these efforts in our latest blog post.

Thank you for taking action!

The AV START Act is the first federal legislation on automated vehicles. This important law should put safety first by requiring that all automated driving systems pass a “vision test” – a test of whether these systems can accurately detect, recognize, and respond to the movements of all transportation systems users – including bicyclists and pedestrians.

Please tell your Senator to vote NO on the AV START Act. As currently written, it does not put safety first and does not require a "vision test."

As currently written, manufacturers must only address how their systems address the avoidance of unreasonable risks to safety, including a "sense of" bicyclists and pedestrians. There is no guarantee that this description provides the public with the knowledge necessary to understand the potential risks of automated vehicles or that such vehicles will be held to a performance standard. 

Estimates from the Insurance Industry for Highway Safety say that more than half of bicyclist deaths could be prevented or mitigated by automated safety technology, but we will not know if we are making progress on that promise without better testing and information. By not requiring such testing or more information in AV START, the Senate is missing an opportunity to put safety first and improve bicyclist safety - and the safety of everyone who uses our roadways.