DON'T TAKE AWAY MY RIGHT TO A DAY IN COURT

Republicans in the House and Senate introduced bills to repeal the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau's new rule to ban forced arbitration clauses -- which allow Wall Street banks and predatory financial institutions to block consumers from joining together in a class action lawsuit. 

In fact, Wells Fargo just recently used forced arbitration to prevent millions of customers who had fraudulent savings and checking accounts opened in their names from having their day in court.

We deserve to be able to hold Wall Street institutions like Wells Fargo and Equifax accountable in court. Demand that your representatives oppose Republican attempts to erase the CFPB’s new rule on forced arbitration!

CONTACT YOUR MEMBERS

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Caller: Good morning/afternoon! Can you let me know Sen. [NAME]’s position on S.J.Res. 47, which would use the Congressional Review Act to strip consumers of their right to hold banks like Wells Fargo accountable in court by repealing a new CFPB rule?

 

Option 1: Opposes using the Congressional Review Act to repeal the CFPB’s new rule on forced arbitration 

 

Staffer: Thank you for calling! Sen. [NAME] opposes using the Congressional Review Act to repeal the CFPB’s new rule on forced arbitration.

 

Caller: That’s great! I’m calling to say that if Sen. [NAME] truly believes, as I do, that we must ensure consumers can join together to challenge big banks in court, he/she should do everything he/she can to oppose using the Congressional Review Act to repeal the rule. This means making public statements or delivering a floor speech opposing the effort to take away my 7th Amendment right to sue my bank for fraud or other illegal behavior. I urge the Senator to emphasize that the average consumer is ordered to pay their bank $7,725 in forced arbitration, according to the Economic Policy Institute.

I’m happy to hear Sen. [NAME] opposes using the Congressional Review Act to repeal the CFPB’s new rule on forced arbitration. Thank you.  

 

     ---- OR ----

 

Option 2: Supports using the Congressional Review Act to repeal the CFPB’s new rule on forced arbitration

 

Staffer: Thank you for calling! Sen. [NAME] supports using the Congressional Review Act to repeal the CFPB’s new rule on forced arbitration.

 

Caller: That’s terrible. That means Sen. [NAME] is choosing to protect predatory financial institutions at the expense of working people. We deserve to hold Wall Street banks like Wells Fargo accountable in court. Just recently, Wells Fargo tried to use forced arbitration to kick consumers defrauded in its fake account scandal out of a public court in Utah, and now we have learned that they defrauded another 800,000 consumers in an auto insurance scam. A new report from the Economic Policy Institute found the average consumer is ordered to pay their bank $7,725 in forced arbitration.

I am appalled that Sen. [NAME] wants to take away my 7th Amendment right to sue my bank for fraud or other illegal behavior, and I strongly urge he/she to reconsider siding with Wall Street over his/her constituents.

 

     ---- OR ----

 

Option 3: Dodges / Has No Position

 

Staffer: Thank you for calling! I’m not sure if the Sen. [NAME] supports or opposes using the Congressional Review Act to repeal the CFPB’s new rule on forced arbitration.

Caller: That’s disappointing to hear—the CFPB’s new rule on forced arbitration is critical to holding Wall Street banks and payday lenders accountable. Just recently, Wells Fargo tried to kick consumers defrauded in its fake account scandal out of a public court in Utah, and now we have learned that they defrauded another 800,000 consumers in an auto insurance scam. A new report from the Economic Policy Institute found the average consumer is ordered to pay their bank $7,725 in forced arbitration. 

I hope Sen. [NAME] will not vote to take away my 7th Amendment right to sue my bank for fraud or other illegal behavior and instead decides to stand with his/her constituents over Wall Street.

 

Staff: I will certainly pass on your concerns to the Congressman/Congresswoman.

 

Caller: Please do, and please take down my contact information to let me know when Sen. [NAME] has made up his/her mind. I’m eager to hear what he/she decides.